Let’s talk about the Selfie

September 29th, 2014

Love it or loathe it, the ‘selfie’ is here to say. Oxford Dictionary even defines it as an ‘informal noun’. I’m sure you are aware that the word was born via social media; its roots are firmly embedded in the hashtag.  However the surprise comes via the growth scale. The word ‘selfie’ has increased in frequency of use by 17,000% in the last year alone.

There is some history to the ‘selfie’, believed to date back to the early 1900’s with Edwardian ladies photographing themselves in mirrors. The difference between a ‘selfie’ and a portrait is that the person takes a photographic image of themselves – and apparently self-portrait paintings don’t count (sorry, Van Gogh).  Since entering the dictionary, it now appears that uploading to a social website is also now part of the terminology, although perhaps there is also room for ‘photographs taken of oneself with the intent of sharing’.

It is believed that the word was founded as far back as 2002, in Australia, when someone posted an image of their face online after falling over stairs. He clarified that it was out of focus because it was a ‘selfie’, i.e. it was DIY.

As for appearances in social media – photo site Flickr appeared to start the trend in 2004, but it really wasn’t particularly well used until 2012.  Instagram now receives over 23 million photos uploaded with the hashtag #selfie. Along with 51 million uploads featuring #me.

The reality is that the smartphone has created this new culture. The forward-facing camera suddenly made it easy for those wanting to snap themselves in dramatic/impressive landscapes at an arms length.  We also no longer needed to send our photos off for costly ‘developing’. The closest fix we previously got was via a passport photo booth or a Polaroid, but neither had the ability to share on a wide scale (posting envelopes of reprints aside). Even digital camera photographs need downloading. The instant access to the internet via our smartphone suddenly allowed us to upload images of ourselves, sit back and watch the ‘likes’ pile up whilst we were still in the spot where the picture was taken.

And there are plenty of apps and accessories out there to support you.

SnapChat has been popular for some time. It’s much like a game of selfie ping-pong, one where I am still learning the rules it would seem, judging by the last image of half TV/half floor I accidentally sent in response to an image of my gurning son. Snapchat’s USP is that each image is viewable by the recipient for just a few seconds until it disappears. Or is screen captured.

As mentioned in last week’s photography blog, FrontBack enables a selfie-lover to take photographs at the same time as taking a forward facing image. There is also a timer function allowing the photographer time to position themselves in a wider landscape. Once taken, both ‘front and back’ images are joined together on one photograph.

Some say the increasing use of the ‘selfie’, along with supporting websites and apps, illustrates a self-obsessed or image-obsessed culture. Others feel it is just the evolution of the camera, the enjoyment people gain from documenting their lives in images and, of course the human desire to be liked. However you look at it, the ‘selfie’ is also the new mirror, and that caught on rather well too.
What do you think?

Catherine Howe is a Marketing Executive at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog.

An app for that #27: Photography

September 26th, 2014

In this week’s blog we look at three unique photography apps. Do any of these appeal to your creative side?

Tired of going away on holiday, or enjoying get a together, only to return with photos of everybody sharing a moment – excluding you?

I stumbled upon FrontBack at a friend’s party recently. Being a keen social photographer has its drawbacks, so a friend had downloaded FrontBack to enable him to take his own image alongside friends, at the same time as taking a forward facing image. There is also a timer function allowing the photographer time to position themselves in a wider landscape.

Once taken, both images are joined together on one photograph, capturing a more rounded view of the event and making the photographer feel more ‘present’. The only technical hitch is that you need a front and back facing camera, of course.

FrontBack is free and available for Android and iOS.

If you are looking for more professional effects, you could try ProCamera8. Designed to take full advantage of iOS 8, ProCamera describes itself as ‘the next dimension of mobile photography’.

Better than your average photo and video editing app, ProCamera 8 turns your iPhone into a DSLR camera, with the ability to shoot high definition images, with a variety of exposure and quality settings.

ProCamera 8 doesn’t just benefit static images, it also allows you to add impact to video as well, from recording at high frame rates, adjusting audio and replaying in slow motion.

The night camera in particular appears to be spectacular with a range of shutter speed settings producing beautiful shots. I’d actually consider buying an iPhone just to use it.

Available for £2.49 on iOS only.

If you are an artsy type, PopKick may be your app. Described as the ‘coolest pop art camera in the world now!’; its developers are certainly confident of its abilities.

Taking the next step up from your usual range of effects, PopKick allows you to turn friends, family and scenic vistas into a Warhol inspired masterpiece. Before you begin, why not try out the 12 filters and toning on some of the available templates.

Of course, as PopKick is all about fun, it comes with the ability to instantly upload and share via various social media platforms, including being able to share your artwork via the PopKick website. The one thing that does appeal to me is that, once your photograph has been ‘Popped’, you can also turn your HD art into posters or canvases easily as well to give your home a truly personalised and stylish touch.

Available for £1.99 on iOS only.

Do you use a photography app and would you recommend it? Let us know.

Catherine Howe is a Marketing Executive at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog.

Kickstart Your Week: Wearables

September 24th, 2014

This week we take a look at some wearables seeking funding, whether strapped to the wrist, ankle or head.

Definition: Wearable technology (also called wearable gadgets) is a category of technology devices that can be worn by a consumer and often include tracking information related to health and fitness. Other wearable tech gadgets include devices that have small motion sensors to take photos and sync with mobile devices.

Tempo, by CarePredict was the first to catch my eye. This device is marketed as ‘Wearable Technology for Seniors’ and although in its infancy, having had a grandparent I needed to keep tabs on, could be a lifesaver for some.

Our lives are a pattern, and the smart device grows to learn its wearer’s pattern. It monitors everything from cooking to sitting, and notices changes, for example if a person has stopped cooking so frequently. If this pattern changes, family members can be alerted inviting them to check in with the wearer. In fact, a reminder is even sent if its intended wearer forgets to put it on. Beacons are placed throughout the home and a hub used to collect the data. This data is then analysed and notifications sent to whichever device is preferred, for example your mobile phone.

Although intended for the elderly, it could be useful for others who struggle to live independently. It would be ideal if the data could also be tracked by the healthcare worker often assigned to the wearer. According to the developers a health insurance company is already interested in the product. This is only the beginning.

Whilst Tempo is for the wrist, SharkStopper is for the ankle. Would you trust ‘acoustic shark repellent technology’ as a wearable? Weighing in around the same as a smartphone, Sharkstopper repels sharks (without harming them) via an acoustic signal which activates once underwater.

It is worn on the ankle as opposed to the wrist as sharks can attack in just two feet of water, making the repellent closer to any shallow lurking sharks. This unique wearable has been tested by brave souls in the Bahamas, Mexico, Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts and New York and is available to pre-order via Kickstarter. As far as we know, all testers are still alive.

Jolt is for the head. It is a small iPod Shuffle sized device which clips onto a headband or helmet and measures the intensity of any hard knocks.

Designed primarily for children who play sports, this wearable sensor allows parents and coaches to ascertain whether one of their players has injured themselves, as it can be quite difficult to tell. Jolt started life following the developer receiving a serious concussion after wrestling practice, which was left undetected and resulted in brain injury. Jolt is easy to wear, easy to charge, will work with a corresponding app (iOS and Android) and could save a child’s life. A worthy investment for any school team.

Would you find any these wearables useful?

Catherine Howe is a Marketing Executive at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog.

The Big Players: Microsoft’s Windows 9, Amazon’s Hydronic Heat and Google’s Android One

September 18th, 2014

In today’s blog, we look at what the Big Players (aside from Apple) are working on over the coming months.

Behold the forthcoming Windows 9 release. Winfuture has recently released a video showing how the new Start menu will operate.

I, like many, will be relieved to see its return. Having bought a laptop earlier this year with a seemingly unremovable Windows 8 on it, I can honestly say that I have considered purchasing a second hand Windows 7 laptop instead; I have certainly used it less than my (dead) Windows 7 laptop because I have found it so frustrating.

Not only was the Start menu removed in Windows 8 but, unless you have a touch screen (my new laptop doesn’t) the Windows 8 tile screen is virtually pointless, so I only ever use the Desktop function. Although, in my opinion, Windows 9 is still touch screen-centric, I intend to download it as soon as humanly possible in order to get my Start menu back. It is rumoured that we’ll see an 8.2 release prior to 9, however we should find out for certain during the Microsoft conference on 30th September.

This week I also discovered an article regarding Amazon and hydronic heat. As someone who has an interest in renewable energy, the announcement that Amazon’s HQ expansion will utilise the energy generated by their data centres to heat their buildings caught my eye.

In short, the heat created by the data centre is transferred to a series of water pipes which travel under the street to Amazon’s central heating systems. Once the heat is removed, the water is then returned to keep the data centre cool.

At present, the design will heat three different buildings. The system could also be scalable, allowing other buildings and data centres to add to the network, self-supplying enough energy for the entire tech district.

Google has been focussing on online accessibility for the 5 million people, globally, who do not have a smartphone. It can be forgotten that countries like the Philippines and India find it hard to obtain or afford the most basic of devices.

The release of Android One is a globally-aware one. To tackle the 3 main issues of the cost of hardware, no access to the latest Android software and, even where 3G and 4G is available, many don’t have phones which can support data in general, let alone the cost of the plan.

Google has, for this project, chosen a particular range of partners, including chipmaker MediaTek, to supply highly affordable yet advanced components, whilst responding to the India market feedback by adding dual SIM card slots, a replaceable battery and an FM Radio.

Although there are affordable smartphones on the market in India, they have heavily customised versions of Android running on them. With the Android One, the device will consistently update to the latest version of Android directly via Google, and agreements with local service providers also allows up to 200MB of monthly downloads for free, along with six months of free updates.  Subsequently this release allows for mass adoption of smartphones and the internet. And when you consider that India is the world’s second largest market in the world for mobile phones this is a business-savvy release.

The Android One is now available in India, with 2 million devices predicted to be sold this year. Further releases are planned for Indonesia, the Philippines and South Asia (and later further afield) in 2015.

Catherine Howe is a Marketing Executive at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog.

Total Bulletin: This Week in Tech

September 17th, 2014

It comes as no surprise to see Apple dominating the technology headlines over the past week after unveiling two new iPhones and the Apple Watch. In today’s weekly round-up blog we will briefly outline all the talking points from the technology industry that you may or may not have heard of from the past seven days.

Firstly, I will start will Apple. After the release of the new iPhones, the Californian tech giant announced that pre-orders for its latest iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus surpassed 4million handsets on its first day. Compared to 2million first-day pre-orders for the iPhone 5 in 2012.

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Microsoft has bought the incredibly popular video game, Minecraft, for a reported £1.5billion however founders of the company have assured fans “everything is going to be OK”. To view seven outstanding Minecraft creations, click here.

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For those who have an interest in gaming, Destiny has reportedly become the UK’s biggest ever launch for a new game series with its publisher selling $500m worth of copies to retailers worldwide.

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The very first Android One branded smartphones have been released in India and Android has partnered with a local network making new apps and updates cheaper for users.

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I love a Selfie as much as the next person however Acer’s Selfie hat is ridiculous! If you haven’t heard of it or seen it make sure you check it out via Mashable.

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SanDisk has created an SD card (the size of a postage stamp) with 512GB of storage space which will go on sale for a whopping £490.

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Scientists at the University of Birmingham unveiled a robot at the British Science festival that they claim can load the dishwasher! Now that’s handy. More on this story here.

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And finally, the news a lot of angered Apple fans have been waiting for. Apple has made it easier for users to remove U2’s latest album, which was given to them free by the company, by clicking here.

Have you come across an interesting tech article over the past seven days?

If so, post the link in the comments section.

Jamie Sansom is Marketing Assistant at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog

Is it worth upgrading to the iPhone 6 or 6 plus?

September 16th, 2014

I have had the latest iPhone’s ever since I was 16 years old and when Tim Cook took centre stage to unveil two new iPhone’s at Apple’s latest conference I knew I wasn’t going to be disappointed. In fact, if the rumours were true, I was going to be just as excited as I was at 16 receiving my own iPhone for the very first time.

The only criticism I have with Apple is it’s often behind the competition when introducing new products. However, when these products are finally released it’s always worth the wait as I believe they are often a cut above the rest in terms of quality and functionality.

For example a number of Apple fans have been crying out for an Apple Phablet ever since Samsung introduced the Galaxy Note II in 2012.

‘iPhone 6 isn’t simply bigger - it’s better in every way’ is one of the quotes Apple used when unveiling the new device so what features does the 6 have that makes it better than its predecessor?

Firstly, and probably most obviously, Apple’s latest handheld devices both have A8 chips with M8 motion coprocessors. This basically means they will be faster and more powerful than the iPhone 5s which featured an A7 chip.

The screen for the iPhone 6 is 4.7 inches (0.7 inches larger than the iPhone 5s) whilst the iPhone 6 Plus has a 5.5 inch screen.

Both the 6 and 6 Plus feature a ‘new’ 8-megapixel iSight camera with 1.5µ pixels and both the devices boost higher pixel resolution displays.

The iPhone 6 is 0.7mm thinner than the 5s and this is what I expected. However, I was surprised to see that the iPhone 6 plus, which features a significantly larger battery than the 5s, is also thinner by 0.5mm.

Another interesting point to mention is that 32GB of storage is not available for the 6 or 6 Plus. Consumers will have to choose from 16GB, 64GB or 128GB however the colour options of Space Grey, Silver or Gold remain the same.

Both the new iPhone’s have several improvements that make them better than the 5s. I do think that its new design is what will persuade Apple consumers to upgrade their devices.

I will be upgrading my 5 to the iPhone 6 in November and I can’t wait! I will also look into buying the Apple Watch in the New Year when it’s released, and if I do, you can be sure I will do a new blog all about it and we might even upload a YouTube video demonstrating a number of its features.

Jamie Sansom is Marketing Assistant at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog

There’s an app for that #26: A Helping Hand

September 15th, 2014

WhatWine is your virtual sommelier handily concealed within your iPhone. Prior to deciding whether to choose a Malbec or Bordeaux with your lamb, this clever app actually scans your wine list and pairs a suggestion to the meal you intend to order.  Each time a wine list is photographed it is added to the WhatWine database. If it isn’t available yet, once you photograph it, other users can then view it.

The difference between WhatWine and other apps is that it offers suggestions prior to ordering, as opposed to scanning a bar code afterwards. Using advanced OCR (optical character recognition), the app is able to extract data from any menu, in any font.

Whilst a sommelier has to study for at least a year, the WhatWine app takes a few minutes to download and use and it’s completely free. If you’re an iPhone user, this is surely worth a try?

RescueTime – Time Tracking is a time monitoring app which stems from its original website parent. Do you ever wonder where you spend most of your time? It is likely spread across a variety of apps, calls and web pages; with this app you can determine exactly the time and where you are spending it.

RescueTime helps you manage distractions alongside productivity to help you get more out of your day.  It also monitors real-world activity via a manual stopwatch, such as time spent in meetings and in the gym.

Once you’ve worked out what you do on a typical day, you will be able to ‘defrag’ it, consolidate your activity and make more of your time. Available for Android only.

Morning Kit has been created to help you get through your day in a more orderly fashion. From the time your alarm goes off you have instant access to news, weather, inspirational quotes, a calendar ready to remind you of your daily appointments, your photographs and even a countdown timer to your next holiday.

The cool clean aesthetics have already won over many fans, and are the key behind this app. Of course many of these functions are already available on smartphones, the great thing about Morning Kit is that all of this information (and perhaps a little inspiration) can be reviewed in one fell swoop, ideal for business travel abroad in particular. I have downloaded this to use for appointments and inspiration – plus I also really like the animation and graphics. Available for both iOS and Android.

Noom Weight Loss Coach can be used to watch your weight, or just keep a healthy track on your life from food intake to exercise. If weight loss is what you’re after, then Noom boasts that users lose an average of 10lbs in 2 months. I found the pedometer feature to be particularly helpful, ensuring I get my daily quota of steps. A colour-coded food database, including over 1 million items, can help you make choices in what you choose to go ahead and eat. Alongside the tracking function, Noom also keeps users updated with motivating articles encouraging healthy lifestyle changes.

Recently redesigned, Noom now looks better than ever with simple but effective functionality.  Noom is free and available for both Android and iOS.

What app couldn’t you live without? Let us know and we’ll review it.

Catherine Howe is a Marketing Executive at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog.

Has Apple revolutionised the wearable tech industry?

September 12th, 2014

It’s been three days since Apple’s latest conference and Apple fans across the globe are still full of excitement and dreaming of the moment they get their hands on the iPhone 6 or the Apple Watch for the first time.

If you have read my recent blog posts you will know I am not the biggest supporter of wearable tech and smartwatches are not something that gets me out of bed in the morning.

However, I do believe Apple is ahead of the competition in the ‘wearable tech’ industry as the Apple Watch is far superior to any other smartwatch I have come across.

Available in two sizes, 38mm or 42mm, the Apple Watch is available in 18 different styles dependant on personal preference and predominant use. For example, if you purchase the Apple Watch with the sole purpose of tracking and monitoring your gym workouts you may choose the sports band. Alternatively if you plan to wear it to work or out in the evenings you are more likely to select a leather strap, a classic strap, a linked bracelet strap or even a Milanese loop strap.

And the customisation doesn’t stop there! The Apple Watch has six different face cases to choose from including Stainless Steel, Silver Aluminium, Space Black Stainless Steel, Space Grey Aluminium and even 18-Karat Yellow or Rose Gold editions.

Please tell me about another smartwatch that can give the user so many unique and customisable features? I guarantee you will struggle to find one.

For the Apple Watch to work users must sync their Watch to their iPhone (yes an iPhone is required). Once this is complete users will have the ability to see and reply to texts, check their mail and calendar, view photos, check the weather, answer incoming phone calls, pay for goods, use GPS tracking features and even control their music simply by using their Watch.

One of the many features I am particularly impressed with is the heart sensor located on the back of the Watch face. This is used for a more precise and accurate measurement of the users heart rate when they are working out. The sensor can give you a complete recording of your daily activity, as well as suggesting goals and rewarding you when you reach certain milestones.

The only question I find myself asking about the Apple Watch is its ability to control music. It’s suggesting you use your iPhone to listen to music as normal but you can use the watch the change tracks and volume. It also states you can leave your iPhone at home and just use the watch but if this is the case, where are you supposed to insert your headphones? Is it suggesting users will have to use Bluetooth headphones?

Any comments or answers regarding the issue above are welcomed as always.

Jamie Sansom is Marketing Assistant at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog

Apple in a nutshell

September 11th, 2014

With this weeks ‘big Apple announcement’ causing great pre-event anticipation and subsequent post-event delight in the Total office (Android fans aside), I look back to a pre-Beats, pre-pod and pre-internet date and review four developments I have found the most interesting during Apple’s nearly-40-year history.

With a reputation for innovation and cutting-edge trend appeal, it’s hard to believe that Apple started off producing hand-built systems in 1976, as ‘Apple Computer’. Both Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak were, in effect, college dropouts operating in a basement, but these ‘dropouts’ knew what the public wanted and knew how to build a computer. Co-founder and adult supervisor Ronald Wayne was also part of the company at this time.

Clearly their skills were far better utilised in the basement than could ever have been in college during this pre-tech era of opportunity. Their first computer, Apple I (pictured above, in casing), was hand-built by Wozniak, whilst Jobs elected the position of salesman, pitching the unique unit at $666 at the time. Wayne drew up the Apple I manual and also developed the first Apple logo.  With potentially more to lose than Jobs and Wozniak, Ronald Wayne left Apple for fear of his assets being seized, selling his share for $800 in 1976.

During the first year, around 175 Apple I systems were sold. A tough pitch considering the unit didn’t come with a case, a power switch and transformer, keyboard or video display.

A year later, the Apple II looked more like a computer as we know it. All yours for $1,300 complete with a 16-colour screen, a whopping 48K RAM and a floppy drive. It was ready to use straight out of the box and described as user-friendly. The ‘hobbyist’ could purchase it as board-only, for just under $800. It is easy to see Apple’s trademark design even in this early model with the casing built of plastic – the first of its kind – built to pull apart very easily to enable expansion.

1993 saw Apple branch into portable devices, with the release of the Newton Message Pad 100. Perhaps released a little too early for the general public, however rumour dictates that Apple’s Vice President at the time had made a bet with the press that, should the product not be released at MacWorld Boston, he would give up his wine cellar.

The personal organiser incorporated fax and email, along with task lists and appointments using the Newton Intelligence operating system, allowing the user to handwrite using a stylus (recognition, however, was a major problem), or use a keyboard. Despite improvements it didn’t really get the recognition it deserved at the time, however in hindsight and with the official product announcement incorporating “And wherever you go, the powerful, under-one-pound personal digital assistant goes too, tucked in your pocket or briefcase.”, Apple were clearly on to something.

It’s hard to believe that the first iPhone was only released in 2007 and is yet regarded as ‘vintage’. The ultra-stylish-at-the-time handset boasted a 2MP camera and the option of purchasing the 4GB, 8GB or 16GB versions. The ‘multi-touch interface’ (or ‘touchscreen’ as we now know and love it) allowed users to swipe and drag – although it wasn’t the first time this technology was deployed, the large touchscreen was unique and didn’t require a stylus and also featured an accelerometer.

Although none of these functions were unique to Apple, combining it in one highly stylised device created excitement. The original iPhone also brought about the ending of the physical keyboard era. The rest, as they say, is history.

Fast forward to the iPod, iCloud, iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, along with the Apple Watch it is clear that despite the highs and lows of the Apple brand, they certainly know how to survive the changes in the technology market; from fever-pitching product releases to firmly embracing the future of everything technology has to offer.

For the latest, why not take a look at Apple fan and Total’s Marketing Assistant Jamie Sansom’s exploration of the latest Apple releases here.

Catherine Howe is a Marketing Executive at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog.

Apple’s latest conference did not disappoint

September 10th, 2014

Yesterday was one of those special days. One of those days that only occurs a few times a year. One of those days where tech bloggers are on the edge of their seats and Apple fans were so overwhelmed with excitement they have spent the last 5 hours fixated on the Apple countdown clock just waiting for the live stream to appear and for Tim Cook to take centre stage. And yes, I was one of those people!

After months of speculation and rumours, Apple has finally announced two new iPhone models, an Apple Watch and its latest iOS8 operating software.

The iPhones were exactly as I expected. Two larger sized models, a 4.7 inch and also a 5.5 inch device in the form of a phablet. Both devices feature Apple’s new A8 chip making them the company’s most powerful iPhone’s yet.

The colours available are identical to the 5s range which include Space Grey, White or Gold and both sizes are available in 16GB, 64GB or 128GB. The 32GB option is no longer available.

So what are the main differences?

Apart from their size, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus have had a whole new make-over. For instance the devices have more rounded edges in comparison to its predecessor (similar to the iPhone 3G if you can recall that long ago) and the lock button that is usually found on the top of the device is on the right hand side.

The new range of iPhone’s will be 4G enabled and they both display a higher pixel resolution than the 5s.

The only disappointment I have with the new devices is the camera. Apple has said they will feature the ‘new’ 8-megapixel iSight camera with 1.5µ pixels. I would have liked a camera with greater megapixels however the 8MP camera I currently use is more than suitable for my photography requirements.

As soon as I discovered Apple had invited fashion bloggers along to its event the introduction of wearable technology was inevitable. Apple’s Watch is the first new product to be released since Tim Cook took the helm.

Make sure you stay tuned in the near future for my blog posts which will focus on Apple’s new smartwatch, its iOS8 operating software and a direct comparison of the iPhone 5s vs iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.

Jamie Sansom is Marketing Assistant at Total Ltd – a business to business service provider, delivering genuine solutions across all core telecommunication services, based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Total Ltd is a business that brings together and unifies all the component parts. For up to the minute business telecommunications news, please view the Total Ltd blog